Elie Hirschfeld’s Favorite New York “Haute Spots” in Haute Magazine

Elie Hirschfeld

FAVORITE RESTAURANT: La Grenouille

BEST SUSHI: Sushi of Gari

BEST STEAKHOUSE: Frankie & Johnnie’s Steakhouse

WHERE WERE YOU BORN: Tel Aviv, Israel

HOW LONG IN NEW YORK: 50 years

NEIGHBORHOOD: Plaza District

OCCUPATION: Real estate developer

BEST ETHNIC FOOD: Taboon

BEST ITALIAN: Bottega Del Vino

BEST PIZZA: Lucali

BEST LUNCH: The Abby Aldrich Dining Room at Rockefeller University

BEST PLACE FOR LATE NIGHT DINING: Brasserie

BEST DESSERT: Junior’s Most Fabulous Cheesecake & Desserts

BEST PLACE FOR A ROMANTIC DATE: The Park Room at The Helmsley Park Lane Hotel

BEST SUNDAY BRUNCH: The Ritz-Carlton

HAUTEST CLUB/LOUNGE: Le Caprice at the Pierre Hotel

BEST PLACE FOR A POWER BUSINESS MEETING: The Prime Grill

IF YOU HAVE OUT OF TOWN GUESTS, WHICH HOTEL WOULD YOU RECOMMEND? St. Regis Hotel

FAVORITE SHOPPING VENUE/BOUTIQUE: Madison Avenue in the 70s

BEST PLACE TO BUY JEWELRY/WATCHES: A La Vieille Russie

BEST SPA: Sports Club/LA on the East side

BEST GYM/ATHLETIC FACILITY: Sports Club/LA on the East side

BEST MASSAGE: Sports Club/LA on the East side

BEST LIMOUSINE/DRIVING SERVICE: My driver

FAVORITE CHARITY EVENT: Continuum Center for Health and Healing Gala

FAVORITE CULTURAL EVENT: The Tony Awards

FAVORITE CULTURAL INSTITUTION: The Neue Gallery

BEST MUSEUM/EXHIBIT: New York Scenes in the Brooklyn Museum

FAVORITE HISTORIC/LEGENDARY PLACE TO SEE OR EXPLORE: The High Line District

ALL-AROUND FAVORITE SPOT IN NEW YORK: Central Park

BEST ASPECT OF NEW YORK: It’s my home

http://mia.hauteliving.com/haute-secrets/?cat=All&market=New%20York&guideid=270

Manhattan Real Estate Mogul, Elie Hirschfeld, Looking to Buy Development Opportunities in All 5 Boroughs

NEW YORK, June 23, 2010 – New York real estate tycoon, Elie Hirschfeld, announced today that he is currently looking to invest in real estate development opportunities in all five boroughs. With all sectors of the market improving in New York, now is the right time to buy.

“Now is a good time to aggressively reengage in the real estate market in New York,” says Elie Hirschfeld, President of Hirschfeld Properties, LLC. “In the next 24 months, the market is primed to bounce back.  The opportunities that exist today will not be around tomorrow.”  With job growth on the horizon and rentals in short supply, today is the day for people to make a long term investment.”

About Elie Hirschfeld

President and CEO of Hirschfeld Properties since 1997, Elie Hirschfeld has dedicated his professional life to real estate development planning and implementation. Since joining the company in 1976, Mr. Hirschfeld’s projects have included the development of prominent New York City properties such as the Grand Sutton, the Hotel Pennsylvania, the Crowne Plaza Hotel, and Park Avenue Court.

Mr. Hirschfeld is responsible for guiding the strategic direction of the company and leading all aspects of development including new project analysis, lease marketing and negotiation, legal strategies, and architectural and construction management. Elie Hirschfeld directed Hirschfeld Properties, LLC into partnerships with other distinguished real estate development firms such as the Zeckendorf Organization, the Donald Trump Organization, The Silverstein Organization, Empire Realty Group, Belz Enterprises of Memphis and the shopping mall development group, The Mel Simon Organization.

Additionally, Hirschfeld is an avid sportsman, having completed the New York City Marathon and the New York City Triathlon several times, and the Mighty Hamptons Triathlon for the last twenty consecutive years.

Elie Hirschfeld Alleviates Parking Woes With www.Park.com

NEW YORK, June 18, 2010 – New York real estate tycoon, Elie Hirschfeld, officially announces the launch of www.park.com. Currently in development with partner Rob Monster, CEO of Epik.com, Park.com will ultimately become the premier destination for consumers to search for parking spots with ease on any internet enabled device.

“Living and working in Manhattan, I am completely familiar with the frustration and challenge it is to park in a city,” says Elie Hirschfeld, President of Hirschfeld Properties, LLC.  “Park.com will help relieve some of that daily stress in cities nationwide by making it easier to find parking while also providing a sense of security knowing that after a long day of work, your car is going to be exactly where you left it that morning.”

In addition to providing security and stress relief to its consumers, the site includes parking areas for those clients who have Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) enabled accounts.  With an RFID tag, clients are able to drive right into specific garages and get a direct charge to a card of choice which will do away with the hassle of searching for the correct amount of change or identification to make it even simpler to live in and commute to urban areas.

For more information, visit www.park.com .

About Elie Hirschfeld

President and CEO of Hirschfeld Properties since 1997, Elie Hirschfeld has dedicated his professional life to real estate development planning and implementation. Since joining the company in 1976, Mr. Hirschfeld’s projects have included the development of prominent New York City properties such as the Grand Sutton, the Hotel Pennsylvania, the Crowne Plaza Hotel, and Park Avenue Court.

Mr. Hirschfeld is responsible for guiding the strategic direction of the company and leading all aspects of development including new project analysis, lease marketing and negotiation, legal strategies, and architectural and construction management. Elie Hirschfeld directed Hirschfeld Properties, LLC into partnerships with other distinguished real estate development firms such as the Zeckendorf Organization, the Donald Trump Organization, The Silverstein Organization, Empire Realty Group, Belz Enterprises of Memphis and the shopping mall development group, The Mel Simon Organization.

Additionally, Hirschfeld is an avid sportsman, having completed the New York City Marathon and the New York City Triathlon several times, and the Mighty Hamptons Triathlon for the last twenty consecutive years.

Elie Hirschfeld Featured on GlobeSt.com

With Labor Figures, Time to Talk of CRE Revival?

Last Updated: June 6, 2010 09:49pm ET

WASHINGTON, DC-Labor Department figures released Friday disappointed many–in all sectors of the economy–with the lackluster growth in private sector hiring. In May, 431,000 jobs were added–the vast majority of which, though, were temporary Census workers. The private-sector only added  41,000 jobs to the economy.

For the real estate industry–a lagging indicator–these numbers are not going to have an immediate impact. Indeed, the fundamentals in the real estate space are not likely to improve at least until the end of the year, according to several industry analysis reports.

Still, though, the latest figures provide an opportunity to take a snapshot of where commercial real estate markets stand right now, compared to a year ago. From that perspective, the situation is slightly less grim. At bottom it shows that progress is being made. “Anecdotally, it is getting better for landlords,” Hirschfeld Properties CEO Elie Hirschfeld tells GlobeSt.com, speaking of the New York City market. “We see that in both office and residential properties. We as landlords needed to really stretch to bring in tenants. One critical sign that the real estate market is improving is the fact that the tenant is back to paying the brokerage fee for residential” as opposed to the landlord, which had been the case for the last year or so.

For office in New York, John B. Brod of PBS Real Estate, is predicting that office rents will rise by the end of 2011. “We see a demand coming between end of 2011 and 2014, as the economy improves.” W. Joshua Levering, SVP of Parsippany, NJ-based NAI James E. Hanson, reports he is seeing an increase in activity, with firms beginning to look for additional space in both the office an industrial segments as well as some retail. Kenneth Katz, co-founder and principal of Houston-based Baker Katz reports that the most substantial and noticeable improvement he is seeing is that, as a whole, retailers are more focused on expanding than they have been at any time since the recession started. “Rental and occupancy rates for first-class retail projects in Houston were minimally affected during the recession,” he says. “Since the development pipeline is virtually empty, we believe that those rates have a limited downside.”

None of this, however, is meant to sugar coat the long-slog ahead. Levering’s colleague Andrew Somple, in the Hackensack, NJ office, put it this way: “There is a lot of pessimism in the marketplace which is stalling any organic growth of users.” Nor does Levering discount the import of employment trends to real estate fundamentals. “Discussions with my customers and clients about hiring typically hinge on what happens in our economy coupled with the overall costs of hiring full time employees,” he tells GlobeSt.com. “It is often easier to hire temporary employees and wait and see how the economy improves.”

http://www.globst.com

Feature on Elie Hirschfeld’s New York Scene Art Collection in Long Island Business News

Art Collector Hungers for more of the Big Apple

By Ambrose Clancy
Published: May 14, 2010
Tags: Andy Warhol, art, art collectors, Pop art

When Elie Hirschfeld met Andy Warhol, he expected to get a master class in pop art and the avant-garde. Warhol had other ideas.

It was 1983 and Hirschfeld, a King’s Point resident and real estate developer, met Warhol for lunch at his famed Manhattan studio, The Factory, where sex and drugs were once indulged in as ardently as artistic expression.

Hirschfeld, looking out the studio’s windows, noted in passing that a building rising across the way was one of his, a residential tower with 684 apartments. He then began to question the artist on his work, but Warhol cut him off.

“All he wanted to talk about was the building project,” Hirschfeld said with a laugh. “I was trying to get him to talk a little art, but he only wanted to talk about business.”

The meeting eventually led to Hirschfeld buying an image of the Brooklyn Bridge that Warhol had been commissioned to create for the bridge’s centennial.

Since then, Hirschfeld’s collection has swelled to 200 works worth more than $15 million and limited to New York City scenes and themes.

Although he said he collects because of his twin passions for art and New York and not as an investment, some experts said Hirschfeld’s collection – which includes such names as Thomas Hart Benton and Christo – will continue to grow in value, defying a recession-ravaged fine art economy.

Last year, the two great international auction houses, Sotheby’s and Christie’s, made a total of $482.3 million in fees from art sales, according to Bloomberg News. The year before, the art houses took in $1.97 billion.

The market is continuing to plunge even with last week’s spectacular sale of a midcareer Picasso for $106.5 million, setting a record for the most expensive painting ever sold. The Mei Moses index, which tracks prices in the art world, reported that the art market was off 5 percent for the first quarter of 2010.

Terry Wallace, a long-time fixture on the Hampton’s art scene, also owner of Easthampton’s Wallace Gallery and a collector himself, said Hirschfeld’s style of collecting is “very smart.”

Since 9/11, works of art with a New York theme done by recognized artists have soared in value, Wallace said. And with Hirschfeld’s sole focus on New York, works by artists in the second tier are elevated by association in a collection containing works by the masters.

Hirschfeld said the weak art market has allowed him to find bargains, since the overall economy has forced some collectors to turn art into cash.

He picked up a painting by one of the founders of the photorealism movement, Richard Estes, for $250,000, a work that normally would have gone for twice that. He also bought his Christo, a model of Madison Square Garden wrapped in cloth, at a bargain basement price.

Hirschfield has never sold pieces of his collection to acquire something new or better, but has kept his possessions intact since

The early 1980s when art sparked an interest. He’d gone to NYU Law School before joining his father in the real estate business. Thumbing through an auction catalog one day he saw something that made him say aloud, “That’s it.”  The painting was a Washington Square Park scene, set directly in front of his alma mater, NYU law school, by Benton, one of the most revered names in American art.

“I’ve never seen another New York scene by Benton,” Hirschfeld said. “He had an aversion to urban life. I could’ve looked for years and never found something on New York by Benton.”

A quick $80,000 lighter in the wallet, Hirschfeld was on his way to building a unique collection.

“From that first painting it was an immediate passion,” he said.

Although sitting on a potential fortune, Hirschfeld said his collection is not for sale and that its purpose is to satisfy his love for the city and his love of beauty.

Now in his 60s, the collector hasn’t yet decided what eventually will become of the art, whether he’ll will it to a family member or an institution.

For now, though, he’s on the hunt for more.

“It’s like fishing,” he said. “There are so many fish out there.”